Alyacen 1/35

Set Dosage Details

Manufacturer

Form

Dosage

Quantity


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HARRIS TEETER PHARMACY Retail

$29.99

Save

64%

$10.67 With Free Coupon
CVS PHARMACY Retail

$29.99

Save

60%

$11.86 With Free Coupon
COSTCO Retail

$29.99

Save

60%

$11.99 With Free Coupon
WALGREENS Retail

$28.39

Save

57%

$12.15 With Free Coupon
WALMART PHARMACY Retail

$28.39

Save

45%

$15.60 With Free Coupon
CVS PHARMACY #
$16.72 With Free Coupon
WEGMANS FOOD MARKETS INC
$21.53 With Free Coupon
SAFEWAY PHARMACY Retail

$29.99

Save

28%

$21.70 With Free Coupon
AKINA PHARMACY
$23.13 With Free Coupon
MY DR'S PHARMACY
$23.13 With Free Coupon
COSTCO PHARMACY
$23.78 With Free Coupon
GIANT PHARMACY
$24.03 With Free Coupon
HARRIS TEETER
$24.53 With Free Coupon
HEALTH STAR PHARMACY
$24.53 With Free Coupon
LIBERTY PHARMACY & MEDICAL SUPPLIES
$24.53 With Free Coupon
LOUDOUN COMMUNITY PHARMACY
$24.53 With Free Coupon
WEGMANS FOOD MARKETS, INC.
$24.53 With Free Coupon
RX+PHARMACY
$24.53 With Free Coupon
LOUDOUN PHARMACY
$24.53 With Free Coupon
Alyacen 1/35

Drug Info for alyacen 1/35

Oral contraceptives (birth-control pills) are used to prevent pregnancy. Estrogen and progestin are two female sex hormones. Combinations of estrogen and progestin work by preventing ovulation (the release of eggs from the ovaries). They also change the lining of the uterus (womb) to prevent pregnancy from developing and change the mucus at the cervix (opening of the uterus) to prevent sperm (male reproductive cells) from entering. Oral contraceptives are a very effective method of birth control, but they do not prevent the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, the virus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]) and other sexually transmitted diseases. Some brands of oral contraceptives are also used to treat acne in certain patients. Oral contraceptives treat acne by decreasing the amounts of certain natural substances that can cause acne. Some oral contraceptives (Beyaz, Yaz) are also used to relieve the symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (physical and emotional symptoms that occur before the menstrual period each month) in women who have chosen to use an oral contraceptive to prevent pregnancy.

  • Afirmelle
  • Aftera
  • AfterPill
  • Altavera
  • Alyacen 1/35
  • Alyacen 7/7/7
  • Amethia
  • Amethia Lo
  • Amethyst
  • Apri
  • Aranelle
  • Ashlyna
  • Aubra
  • Aubra EQ
  • Aurovela 1.5/30
  • Tablet
  • Chewable Tablet
  • Coated Tablet

Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to use. Do not use more than directed.

Read and follow the patient instructions that come with this medicine. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

You may take this medicine with food to lessen stomach upset.

Keep your pills in the container you receive from the pharmacy. Take the pills in the order they appear in the container.

Take your pill at the same time every day. Swallow the tablet whole. Do not crush, break, or chew it.

If you are using the chewable tablets, you may chew the tablet completely before swallowing. Drink a full glass (8 ounces) of water right after swallowing.

You should not use this medicine if you have had an allergic reaction to oral contraceptives, or if you are pregnant. Do not use this medicine if you have breast cancer, cancer of the uterus, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, or a history of blood clots, heart attack, or stroke. Do not use this medicine if you have problems with your liver (such as liver tumor), jaundice (yellowish eyes or skin), certain types of headaches, unusual vaginal bleeding, or if you are having a surgery that needs bedrest.

Although you are using this medicine to prevent pregnancy, you should know that using this medicine while you are pregnant could harm the unborn baby. If you think you have become pregnant while using the medicine, tell your doctor right away.

Use a different kind of birth control during the first 3 weeks of oral contraceptive use to make sure you are protected from pregnancy.

Make sure your doctor knows if you are breastfeeding, or if you have lupus, edema (fluid retention), seizure disorder, asthma, migraine headaches, or a history of depression. Tell your doctor if have breast lumps, high cholesterol, gallbladder disease, liver disease, kidney disease, or irregular monthly periods.

This medicine will not protect you from getting HIV/AIDS or other sexually transmitted diseases. If this is a concern for you, talk with your doctor.

If you smoke while using birth control pills, you increase your risk of having a heart attack, stroke, or blood clot. Your risk is even higher if you are over age 35, if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or if you are overweight. Talk with your doctor about ways to stop smoking. Keep your diabetes under control. Ask your doctor about diet and exercise to control your weight and blood cholesterol level.

Tell any doctor or dentist who treats you that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before you have surgery or medical tests.

Check with your eye doctor if you wear contact lenses and you have vision problems or eye discomfort.

You should see your doctor on a regular basis (every 6 months or 1 year) while taking birth control pills.

If you miss two periods in a row, call your doctor for a pregnancy test before you take any more pills.

It is best to wait 2 or 3 months after stopping birth control pills before you try to get pregnant.

Swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet.

Yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes.

Make sure your doctor knows if you are using antibiotics (such as ampicillin, rifampin, tetracycline, Omnipen®, Rimactane®) or antifungals (such as griseofulvin, Grifulvin V®), medicine for seizures (such as phenobarbital, phenylbutazone, phenytoin, carbamazepine, felbamate, oxcarbazepine, topiramate, primidone, Luminal®, Dilantin®, Tegretol®, Felbatol®, Trileptal®, Topamax®, Mysoline®), modafinil (Provigil®), or medicine to treat HIV or AIDS (such as ritonavir, Norvir®).

Tell your doctor if you are also using St. John's Wort, atorvastatin (Lipitor®), vitamin C (ascorbic acid), acetaminophen (Tylenol®), itraconazole (Sporanox®), ketoconazole (Nizoral®), cyclosporine (Gengraf®, Neoral®, Sandimmune®), prednisolone (Delta Cortef®, Prelone®), theophylline (Theo-Dur®, Slo-Phyllin®, Gyrocaps®), temazepam (Restoril®), morphine (Astramorph PF®, Duramorph®, Avinza®, MS Contin®, Roxanol®), or salicylic acid.

Make sure your doctor knows if you are breastfeeding, or if you have lupus, edema (fluid retention), seizure disorder, asthma, migraine headaches, or a history of depression. Tell your doctor if have breast lumps, high cholesterol, gallbladder disease, liver disease, kidney disease, or irregular monthly periods.

This medicine will not protect you from getting HIV/AIDS or other sexually transmitted diseases. If this is a concern for you, talk with your doctor.

If you smoke while using birth control pills, you increase your risk of having a heart attack, stroke, or blood clot. Your risk is even higher if you are over age 35, if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or if you are overweight. Talk with your doctor about ways to stop smoking. Keep your diabetes under control. Ask your doctor about diet and exercise to control your weight and blood cholesterol level.

Tell any doctor or dentist who treats you that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before you have surgery or medical tests.

Check with your eye doctor if you wear contact lenses and you have vision problems or eye discomfort.

You should see your doctor on a regular basis (every 6 months or 1 year) while taking birth control pills.

If you miss two periods in a row, call your doctor for a pregnancy test before you take any more pills.

It is best to wait 2 or 3 months after stopping birth control pills before you try to get pregnant.

  • Allergic reaction: Itching or hives, swelling in your face or hands, swelling or tingling in your mouth or throat, chest tightness, trouble breathing
  • Chest pain, shortness of breath, or coughing up blood.
  • Heavy vaginal bleeding.
  • Irregular or missed menstrual period.
  • Lumps in breast.
  • Nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, pain in your upper stomach.
  • Numbness or weakness in your arm or leg, or on one side of your body.
  • Pain in your lower leg (calf).
  • Rapid weight gain.
  • Sudden or severe headache, problems with vision, speech, or walking.
  • Swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet.
  • Yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes.
  • Sensitivity to sunlight.
  • Bloated feeling.
  • Vaginal spotting or light bleeding, itching, or discharge.
  • Contact lens discomfort.
  • Mild skin rash or itching, or change in skin color.
  • Tiredness.
  • Stomach cramps.
  • Changes in appetite.
  • Mild headache.
  • Depression or mood changes.
  • Weight changes.
  • Breast tenderness, pain, swelling, or discharge.